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Bringing healthcare to hard-hit areas in Bangladesh

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Undetected and undertreated: shaping policy on atrial fibrillation in Saudi Arabia

Among the diseases referred to as silent killers, atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly important public health problem, with incidence expected to double over the next three decades. The global incidence of AF has increased by approximately 30% over the past 20 years, and more than 37m people are estimated to be living with AF, significantly impacting health, mortality risk and quality of life.

The value of action: mitigating the impact of neurological disorders in the United Kingdom

<p><em>The value of action: mitigating the impact of neurological disorders in the United Kingdom </em>is a report from Economist Impact, supported by Roche. While it draws heavily on the disease burden and economic analyses undertaken in 2022, this report’s focus is on the UK’s results and is supplemented by additional research providing context relevant to the UK policy environment.</p>

From strategy to impact: a holistic approach to dengue prevention in Thailand

Dengue, a disease affecting millions globally, is witnessing an escalating burden. This surge is partly attributed to climate change, which not only broadens the habitats of the mosquitoes carrying the disease but also propels people into dengue-affected areas.

Time to put your money where your mouth is: addressing inequalities in oral health

Oral diseases have surpassed all other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in terms of their global prevalence. The most common oral diseases are caries and severe periodontitis, affecting about 2bn and 1bn people, respectively. Furthermore, these two highly prevalent diseases have a disproportionate impact on countries and populations with lower socioeconomic status.

Shaping a future of healthy ageing: reflections from the Global Healthspan Summit

Shaping a future of healthy ageing: reflections from the Global Healthspan Summit

Positioning health at the forefront of climate negotiations

Positioning health at the forefront of climate negotiations

Breathing in a new era: a comparative analysis of lung cancer policies in Taiwan, South Korea and Japan

Breathing in a new era: a comparative analysis of lung cancer policies in Taiwan, South Korea and Japan

 

The battle against lung cancer calls for immediate attention to improve policies, programmes, and treatment accessibility. The goal? To curb its incidence, enhance health outcomes, and uplift the quality of life for those grappling with this deadly disease.

 

Building a sustainable future: balancing growth, net-zero goals and public health

Building a sustainable future: balancing growth, net-zero goals and public health.

Mitigating the ongoing and future health, economic and organisational consequences associated with covid-19

Despite the end of the declared public health emergency, the lingering effects of covid-19 still impacts people’s health, work and productivity. The current winter season introduces the risk of a “tripledemic” — the simultaneous occurrence of flu, covid-19 and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) —, also making it more prevalent. At the same time, the prolonged effects of “long covid” winders the life of millions. In light of that, businesses must remain vigilant about the risks associated to covid-19.

Fertility policy and practice: a Toolkit for the Asia-Pacific region

The fertility rates of many countries in the Asia Pacific region (APAC) have been drastically declining over the past 70 years. This has had an impact not only on the population size of these countries, but also on the structure of the population. South Korea has the lowest total fertility rate (TFR) in the world at 0.8, well below the replacement rate of 2.1, and Singapore and Japan are not much higher, at 1.1 and 1.3 respectively. Along with this, the population of older persons (aged over 60) in the region is expected to triple between 2010 and 2050. 
 

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