The workplace response to neurological conditions: A focus on migraine, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease

Migraine, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) affect over 1.3bn people globally. The report  looks at the impact of these three neurological conditions on both patients and carers in the workplace.

Video | 70 is the new 50

is a report from The Economist Intelligence Unit, sponsored by HSBC Life. The report is based on a consumer survey conducted in June 2021 of more than 600 Hong Kong residents aged 30-70 on their preparedness and perception towards post-retirement. The report was written by Siddharth Poddar and Shivaji Bagchi, and edited by Naka Kondo.

Productive ageing in Hong Kong: Breaking the mould of ageing

Productive ageing in Hong Kong is a report from The Economist Intelligence Unit, sponsored by HSBC Life. The report is based on a consumer survey conducted in June 2021 of more than 600 Hong Kong residents aged 30-70 on their preparedness and perception towards post-retirement. The report was written by Siddharth Poddar and Shivaji Bagchi, and edited by Naka Kondo. Findings from the survey were supplemented with wide-ranging research and in-depth interviews with experts in the field.
 

Infographic | Productive ageing in Hong Kong

 

Hong Kong has the world’s longest life expectancy. In 2019, the average life span was 82.4 years for men and 88.2 years for women. How will people spend these additional golden years? Will Hong Kong’s elderly be able to live their lives with dignity and self-respect? The Economist Intelligence Unit, sponsored by HSBC Life, conducted a consumer survey in June 2021 on the state of “productive ageing” in Hong Kong and people’s preparedness for the challenges of and opportunities in life after work.

Thailand: Osteoporosis moves up the health policy agenda

For many years, recalls Dr Sattaya Rojanasthien – head of the Department of Orthopaedics at Chiang Mai University Hospital – doctors “tried to tell policy makers about the increasing burden of osteoporosis” in Thailand. Hard information to back up the assertion was limited. No reliable estimates exist, for example, for the prevalence of osteoporosis, while published figures on hip fractures cover individual cities and almost all are from before 2010. Nevertheless, even at that time, available data were already showing an increase in hip fractures of 2% per year at that time.1

Osteoporosis: A challenge obscured, not eliminated

Covid-19 has rightly seized the attention of health system officials. Nevertheless, the disease has done nothing to change the underlying consideration which led the WHO – and, just as recently, also the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) and the G201 – to raise the policy profile of healthy ageing’s importance to economic growth and human well-being. More and more of us are living longer and longer. This is good news, but also presents challenges.

解决亚太地区心血管疾病复发的问题

亚太地区心血管疾病二级预防报告

亚太地区心血管疾病的负担因国家/地区而异,但无论任何国家/地区都负担沉重。总体来说,心血管疾病在该地区是造成死亡的首要或次要原因,其患病率也在不断增长。除此以外,该地区人口结构的变化——患心血管疾病的年轻人增加,同时患有多种合并症的老龄人口也呈增长趋势——令医疗系统越来越不堪重负。

应对心血管疾病相关问题的进展主要集中于一级预防领域,同时心血管疾病年龄标准化患病率也正在降低。然而心脏病和卒中复发的几率长期居高不下,令人难以接受,而与之相关的经济和人力成本亦威胁着已经取得的进步。由于越来越多的患者能在心脏病或卒中首次发病时幸存,复发事件所带来的负担很可能会更加沉重。这一状况需要紧急的关注,但同时也带来了一个非常有可能实现的机遇——改善该患者群体所接受的医疗护理及其效果。

本次由经济学人智库(The Economist Intelligence Unit/The EIU)所做的分析探究了亚太地区在管理心血管疾病复发事件上的政策响应措施,研究主要聚焦于以下八个经济体:澳大利亚、中国大陆、中国香港、中国台湾、日本、新加坡、韩国以及泰国。

本研究主要发现包括:

Global healthy ageing challenges: The need for transformation

Over the past 35 years, global life expectancy has increased significantly: 11 years for men and 12 years for women (67.5 and 73.3, respectively). The UN estimates that average life expectancy will increase from the current 71 years to 77 years in 2050.

Ageing with strength: Addressing fragility fractures in Asia-Pacific

By 2050 Asia-Pacific will be home to 1.3bn people older than 60. This growth will happen at a time when lifespans are also becoming longer. As a result, the region is expected to see an increase in diseases associated with age. Among them is osteoporosis, a condition that makes bones less dense and more fragile and can cause fragility, or low-impact, fractures—those that occur (often to the hip, spine or wrist) when someone falls from a standing height or lower.

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