Technology & Innovation

A New Age Of Culture: The Digitisation of Arts and Heritage

April 12, 2017

Global

April 12, 2017

Global
Chris Clague

Managing editor Asia & Global editorial lead, Trade and globalisation

Chris Clague is managing editor in Asia for Economist Impact. He is an expert in international trade and trade policy and has also advised clients throughout the Asian region on the strategic implications of megatrends and political risk. He was a consultant in The Economist Group's Tokyo office and was the project leader and editor for the Economist Intelligence /Nikkei BP publication The World to 2050 (available in Japanese only). 

Prior to joining The Economist Group, he was a senior consultant and Director of China Operations for a boutique consulting firm that worked with governments and MNCs on issues related to international trade, investment, and commodities. 

Chris holds an MSc in Asian Politics from the London School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) and a certificate in International Trade Law and Economics from the World Trade Institute’s summer academy. He provides regular commentary on trade and the Japanese economy to international media.

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How well is your country performing on cultural digitisation?

For many years, the cultural sector remained one of the very few to be only lightly touched by the disruption that Internet- and mobile-driven changes were bringing to other industries and segments of society. That is no longer the case. Cultural institutions in much of the world are now busy deploying digital technologies and quickly trying to make up for lost time.

Based on data collected from 243 arts and heritage institutions, The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) assesses the progress of cultural digitisation in 22 countries. 

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